Genealogy Merry-Go-Round

I find one’s genetic makeup interesting.  My significant other–not as much.

Were websites, such as ancestry.com, simply ploys to separate us from our money?

Obviously, if they weren’t making money, they wouldn’t stay in business.  How was it possible for someone to be related to Cleopatra?  …Or, some other historical figure, at a time when record keeping wasn’t what it is today?

I’m going to assume it’s done with genetic coding.  Those from the Middle East have common genetic markers.  Others, from elsewhere in the world, have their own specific markers.  My unbelieving spouse and I, agreed to disagree.

My family history, on both sides, was researched before the digital age.  The ancestry website confirmed what was already known–back to the eighteenth century.  Although,  television commercials are entertaining, I’ve not received pictures of any of my ancestors–especially, the way-back ones.

Without going into detail, here’s what was previously known.  My paternal great-grandfather’s family came from Upper Austria.  My maternal great-grandfather’s family came from Yorkshire, England.  My maternal, great-grandmother was Dutch.

Breakdown from the popular ethnicity website:

  • Great Britain———————————77%
  • Eastern Europe——————————-15%
  • Iberian Peninsula——————————2%
  • Asia—————————————–2%
  • Ireland—————————————1%
  • Western Europe——————————–1%
  • Italy/Greece, Finland/NW Russia——————<1%

 

Katherine and Eric, from the television commercial–Katherine was surprised to find out that Eric wasn’t Italian, but rather Eastern European.  My 2% Iberian Peninsular and Asian ancestry was certainly a surprise.  It’s not likely to stir any interest from the ancestry.com folks.  However, genealogy may explain why my great-aunt made plum pudding for the Holidays every year.

Zero For Three

Sunday morning breakfast has been a tradition for as long as we’ve been a couple.

Not that chain restaurants aren’t good in their own rights. When the same entrees become old and tired, it’s time to find something new.

Last Sunday, we drove by two local, diner-type restaurants–they were both closed. Back to good old Cracker Barrel for usual fare.

Today, an old favorite, known for comfort food, let me down. Formerly, they had breakfast buffets on weekends. They were open, and we were the only, early morning diners.

It seems in the last nine years, due to the economy, the Sunday breakfast buffet was no more. They still were open with a lunch buffet on weekdays.

The quest continues for a mom-and-pop local breakfast restaurant–within a 20 mile radius.  Food, prepared with love–because love conquers all.