First Day Of School

County schools opened today.  Kids lined up for yellow buses everywhere.  It seemed too early–weather was still too hot for school.

Did teachers ask students to write compositions about what they did on summer vacation, to then be read aloud in front of the class?  I dreaded every new school year because of this.

Of course, the other elephant in the room, was the eclipse.  Compared to drama in other parts of the country, it was a non-event here.  The sun went in-and-out of clouds so much, it was hard to tell what was eclipse, and what wasn’t.

What had I done on summer vacation?  The question answered with shoulder shrugs and general indifference.  There were some things one didn’t ‘fess up to.

The truth was–I went to the creek with my brother.  Skipped rocks and committed numerous infractions.  Going to the creek was forbidden.  Skipped vespers at church camp with a partner-in-crime.  Sworn to secrecy.  I could have been excommunicated; or something worse if my parents found out.

 

 

Double Bubble/Double Trouble

Continuing on with posts about Mother’s Day week.  This time about bubblegum.  I still remember how sore my jaw muscles got from chewing big wads of bubblegum.

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Bubblegum was a childhood delight.  It had to be Fleer’s “Dubble Bubble” bubblegum.  Other brands were almost as good–“Bazooka” and gum with baseball cards.  Baseball card gum was thin and flat–somewhat brittle.

Inside the wrapper was a folded up cartoon strip, “Fleer’s Funnies,” featuring a chubby young chap “Pud” and friends.  There’s a moniker you won’t hear in the twenty-first century.  The stories were lame–meant to sell more bubblegum.  A quarter or fifty cents bought a sack full of candy in those days–which was a typical weekly allowance.

Experts could easily blow bubblers as big as their heads.  This was imitated by little brothers and sisters, who eventually got gum all over their faces.  Double Bubble tasted so good, that one piece wasn’t enough.  About four pieces made a fist-sized wad–enough to make jaw muscles ache.

Adults hated bubblegum–especially parents and teachers.  Gum smacking was almost as irritating as fingernails on a chalkboard.  Gum got disposed of under desks and chairs.  Gum got stepped on, ended up on the bottoms of dress shoes on the way to church or school.

“Don’t swallow that gum.  Where is it?”  Asked moms and dads.  “It’s too late–I already swallowed it,” Was the usual reply.  “Don’t do that.  You’ll clog up your insides and I’ll have to take you to the doctor,”  Mom warned.  I don’t know if it ever happened to anybody.

“Take your bubblegum out of your mouth before going to bed,”  Mom advised.  The next morning, gobs of gum were stuck everywhere in my hair.  Mom got the dullest pair of scissors she could find;  cut and pulled the gum globs out.

The worst part was next day at school.  “What happened to your hair?  Eww–do you have ringworm?  Who cut your hair?  …The Three Blind Mice?”  Hair grew back fast–it was off to new adventures.

MORE TO COME

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Squirming kids

Sons and daughters

Of war veterans

Struggled to pay attention

Under teacher’s watchful eyes

Surrounded by nation’s flag

With forty-eight stars

A portrait of a red-faced

George Washington

Clouded at the bottom

Desks attached together

Salvaged from nameless

Closed-down one-room schools

Useful until something better came along

Inkwells, now used for mischief

Years passed–recollections

Childhood enthusiasm faded

A lifetime of toil

Left unfinished

http://gsmnp.com/

DUBBLE BUBBLE/DOUBLE TROUBLE

dubbubcdecal

Bubblegum was a childhood delight.  It had to be Fleer’s “Dubble Bubble” bubblegum.  Other brands were almost as good–“Bazooka” and gum with baseball cards.  Baseball card gum was thin and flat–somewhat brittle.

Inside the wrapper was a folded up cartoon strip “Fleer’s Funnies” featuring a young chap “Pud” and friends.  There’s a moniker you won’t hear in the twenty-first century.  The stories were lame–meant to sell more bubblegum.  A quarter or fifty cents bought a sack full of candy in those days–which was a typical weekly allowance.

Experts could easily blow bubbles as big as their heads.  This was imitated by little brothers and sisters, who eventually got gum all over their faces.  Double Bubble tasted so good, that one piece wasn’t enough.  About four pieces made a fist-sized wad–enough to make jaw muscles ache.

Mothers and dads hated bubble gum.  It got disposed of in unhandy places and ended up on the bottom of dress shoes on the way to church or school.

“Don’t swallow that gum.  Where is it?”  “It’s too late–I already swallowed it,” was the usual answer.  “Don’t do that.  You’ll clog up your insides and I’ll have to take you to the doctor,” Mom warned.  I don’t know if it ever happened to anybody.

“Take your bubble gum out of your mouth before going to bed,”  Mom advised.  The next morning there were globs of gum stuck in my hair.  Mom got the dullest pair of scissors she could find; cut and pulled the gum out.

The worst part was at school.  “What happened to your hair?  Eww–do you have ringworm?”  “Who cut your hair?  …The Three Blind Mice?”  All was soon forgotten and it was off to new adventures.

–Image,http://www.theimaginaryworld.com/