Holiday Wrap Up 2017

The same post-Holiday concerns–extra pounds packed on, the long drive home, bad weather.

An hour-long traffic jam due to a horrendous car wreck. How could that BMW have gotten wedged under bridge supports in that manner? Could anyone have survived?

It was quite a contrast in weather conditions, between yesterday morning and today. Yesterday, with snow and ice–four degrees Fahrenheit, with a wind chill of minus seven. Today, cloudy, with drizzle and forty degrees.

Nothing in the house to eat for breakfast. Off, to a nearby comfort food restaurant. Mountains of dirty laundry await.

All-in-all a good Christmas. Everyone in good health and good spirits. The good outweighed the bad.

Yesterday was filled with explanations, exclamations at bad drivers,  and stories that took way too long. Ploys to keep drivers awake on an 800 mile journey.


Black Friday & Anti-Locavorianism

Himalayan bath oil… New Mexican firewood… Contemptuousness for all things local.

Acceptability achieved for brief awkward moments when narrow confines of passions intertwined.  In ancient times, called establishing commonality.

Same actors, same roles, encore performances.  No conversation topics off limits.  Everyone knew where they fit on the political, social spectrum–no boundaries were crossed.  What would have been the point?

Bargains perused, for participants in post-holiday shopping frenzy.

After a satisfying breakfast together, content to be left behind.


Happy Soupsgiving

No one needs to be reminded of the countdown to Christmas.  It seems to me that after Halloween ends, the Holiday season is upon us.

Our family tradition–a holiday before the Holidays.  No gifts exchanged–except for homemade beef vegetable soup, simmered all day. Homemade chicken noodle soup for those that prefer.

Estranged family members still crave it and are never turned away.  They are obliged with a quart of home-made soup to take home.  Leftovers are enjoyed for days.

Just a few more days till “Soupsgiving.” I can’t wait.  There will be plenty for everyone.  Happy Soupsgiving everyone.

Buying & Selling (Happy Fifth Birthday)

To sell something, you need to provide something people want. “Don’t give away the store; 1% of something was better than, 1% of nothing.”  The relationship between buyers and sellers was tenuous at best.

Where were the hidden gold mines that enticed on the net? Engineered to appeal to insatiable appetites for excessiveness–“real deals,” “hidden money,” “little-known paths to prosperity.”

New!  Improved!  With less hyperbole, more content!  Congratulations are in order on this blogs fifth anniversary.  I’m more surprised than anyone.  I have plenty more to say, so keep reading and commenting.

Taking It Easy

Out to breakfast at my favorite diner. There seemed to be a lot on this blog about dining.

That should come as no surprise to those who know me. I like to eat–it’s a challenge to enjoy fine dining and stay healthy.

Preparations need to be made for an extended trip out of town.  There’s still plenty of time.

This Father’s Day, I’m content to take a back seat–watch children, grandchildren, nieces and nephews. If they attain success, then I’m happy.

The Kid’s Table

Let’s see a show of hands. How many of you remember the kid’s table? …At Christmas, Thanksgiving, Easter, and family gatherings.

Adults sat in the dining room, discussed the usual.  Was it pass to the left or right?  Nobody ever gave an answer–because, from that point they would be regarded as the family etiquette expert.

“Where did you get all that energy?  My how you’ve grown.  What grade were you in school?  Did you like school this year?”  Questions answered with poker faces, shoulder shrugs, and “I don’t knows.”

Older kids served themselves.  Younger ones had plates fixed by moms, grandmas, aunts, older brothers, and sisters.  “Eat something else besides mashed potatoes.  Take some of these green beans.  No dessert till you’re finished.”  Lots of laughter prevailed, subdued, so, as to not draw attention from the adult table.

Everybody had a cousin Ralphie–or, someone like him.  Cousin Ralphie balanced green peas on his knife, ate disgusting food mixtures–pickled beets, mashed potatoes, and milk.

“Cousin Ralphies” turned their eyelids inside out, to disgusted “ewws” and “ahs” at the kid’s table.  “What did he need ketchup for?”  A self-appointed gastronomic virtuoso, Ralphie shared his secrets on holidays.  Ketchup made everything more palatable.  It was rumored, Ralphie subsisted on ketchup sandwiches at home.

Mid-afternoon, after dishes were cleared, washed, and put away, the oldest adults were first to leave.  Early evening, tears flowed from the eyes of younger ones, that wanted to stay longer.  Moms, sisters, aunts comforted.  Dads weren’t as patient.

It Wasn’t Being Disrespectful

Yesterday, was Memorial Day–a day for most folks to go to the beach, have a picnic, take the day off; enjoy life in general.

Not so, in my case. I did repairs on my barn’s fascia boards. At my age, I don’t do heights and climbing ladders, as well as I used to.

Help, was solicited from a friend, planned a few weeks ago. He came with help, the job completed promptly and competently.

It’s on me to do caulking and painting–which I can handle. Too tired to do any barbecuing, my spouse and I went for take-out, last evening.

Sleep came easy.  One problem gone, on to the next challenge.