Inside a Sardine Can

Abandoned things they learned
Listened from the shadows
Like hermit crabs
Drunk on screw-cap wine
Mixed up nights and days
Worked at the almost competitive
Computer and electronics store
More efficiency achieved
When bosses were gone
Discussed the amount of fun
Homeowners could have
Like lawn trimmer tea
Brewed from grass clippings

Waiting

Waiting for the washer to finish spin cycle. This is holding up breakfast. Newer machines with computerized controls are convenient, but more complicated.

This is not about perils of technology, rather about waiting. How many hours does an average person, in a lifetime, spend waiting?
Waiting for everything. At the doctor’s office. In traffic congestion. At the airport.

A fair assessment would be, that at least, half of our lives are spent waiting.  Most of the time, there’s not much we can do.  How we react to waiting–with impatience or calmness, is our choice.  What we do with that time, determines whether or not it was wasted.

Working Stiffs

You knew
If you were there too
Sometimes serious
Other times silly
Someone complained
Several times per day
Days were too long
Didn’t dare take lengthy breaks
Long night shifts
Stared at the parking lots
Listened to piped-in music
“It’s tearing me apart…
Na, na, na, na, na, na
Na, na, na, na, na, na…”
“La, la, la, What?, What?
Oh yeah, Oh yeah
Ooo, Ooo, Ooo, Ooo ah”–More “Whats”
And, another, “Oh yeah”

But Wait–There’s More…

Storms and rain for today, after a four-day stretch of fair weather.  It’s been an otherwise rainy summer–unusual for here in July and August.

Satellite TV is snapping on and off.  Which leads to the question of what to do on rainy days?  If I don’t go to my regular, Friday gym visit, I’ll be watching You Tube “how-to” videos all day.

It’s frustrating when things don’t work.  You Tube videos featured mechanical and electronic dragon conquerors.  They made repairs look easy.  Tempted me into thinking, that indeed, I too, could possibly attempt such tasks–emphasis on the word attempt.

One such You Tube channel discussed the quality, or lack of, in today’s RV trailers.  Had quality slipped since RV trailers had been lightened, because of more fuel-efficient towing vehicles?

From my experience, quality was never that great before.  I’ve found staples through electric wires from assembly errors, faulty voltage converters, roof leaks, among other things.

My advice–buy a quality product from a reputable dealer.  I agreed, that anyone contemplating the RV lifestyle, should carry along a basic tool and repair kit.  Mechanical aptitude would also be helpful.

No matter how bored I become today.  There’s nothing in my imagination that will top the weirdness of yesterday’s headline–“NASA seeks applicants to protect us from aliens.”  Be wary–they may already be here.

Moving Ahead

Getting ready for a trip out of town. It’s supposed to rain as much as ten inches in the next three days because of a tropical weather system.

That’s making for additional preparations. Should I take umbrellas, rain ponchos? A towel to dry off our two mutts that always travel with us? All of these will be likely be taken.

A new pet barrier was installed between the two front seats in the car. Our dogs are too big to be lap dogs while driving. Maggie will probably still poke her nose behind it–as she tends to get bored easily.

Hoping the rain slacks off as we head northward. Some cooler weather, would also be nice.

Old People’s Houses

Remember going to old people’s houses when you were a kid?  They were dark and dreary, smelled musty.  There was no reading material for kids.  Worst of all, there were no toys to play with.

Lace curtains covered the windows–which were never opened.  Something to do with bad air.  Hand crocheted lace doilies covered stuffed chair arms and headrests.  They always fell down when kids got restless.  What good were doilies–anyway?  Playing with them always got you in trouble.

Old people liked to sit around and talk.  Talked about boring stuff and the good old days.  When a dollar bought something, and people knew the value of hard work.

Fidgeting didn’t work.  Neither did the sad-eyed, “can we go now, mom?”  Too much fidgeting brought the rapier-sharp “death stare” and the excuse, “you didn’t get enough sleep last night.”

Their pets were old–too.  Old dogs or cats, half-blind or deaf.  They sat on their owner’s laps and didn’t do much.  Old people seemed to know if they needed something.

The truth–old people were tired.  Tired of being sick.  Tired of being taken for granted.  Tired of disrespect.  Tired of being thought of as just being old.