That Was Quite a Week

Got my new glasses Friday. Seeing clearly, once again, was a good thing. Those that followed this blog knew I broke them Saturday, a week ago.

It’s gone from summer to fall, and back again to summer, in one short week. Influenced by those crazy nuts–Harvey and Irma.

Anyone with pets will attest to the difficulties of vacuuming pet hair. Our old vacuum succumbed, and the replacement was put to the test.

Due to our long-haired pooch, it wasn’t long before the beater bar on the new machine was wrapped with hair. Some of this could be blamed on the old machine’s failures–the new one working twice as hard.

All things considered, I wouldn’t want to be like Bill Murray in “Ground Hog Day,” and relive this week again.

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First Day Of School

County schools opened today.  Kids lined up for yellow buses everywhere.  It seemed too early–weather was still too hot for school.

Did teachers ask students to write compositions about what they did on summer vacation, to then be read aloud in front of the class?  I dreaded every new school year because of this.

Of course, the other elephant in the room, was the eclipse.  Compared to drama in other parts of the country, it was a non-event here.  The sun went in-and-out of clouds so much, it was hard to tell what was eclipse, and what wasn’t.

What had I done on summer vacation?  The question answered with shoulder shrugs and general indifference.  There were some things one didn’t ‘fess up to.

The truth was–I went to the creek with my brother.  Skipped rocks and committed numerous infractions.  Going to the creek was forbidden.  Skipped vespers at church camp with a partner-in-crime.  Sworn to secrecy.  I could have been excommunicated; or something worse if my parents found out.

 

 

Another One of Those Days

The day started as usual. When I returned from walking the dogs at seven this morning, the doors to the sunroom were closed.

A bad sign; the thermostat near the A/C read nearly 80 degrees. Our patched-together HVAC unit bit the dust. After mowing and trimming the lawn, we holed up in the sunroom–which had its own HVAC system.

Technicians worked till around 3:30 in the afternoon.  All turned out well in the end–although a few dollars poorer. Chalked up as another chapter in the joys of home ownership.

Sticks and Stones

Away from home

While missing home

Tropical uncertainties traded

For low humidity, blue skies

Family traditions

Free room and board

Minor discomforts

Boring road food

Some of it was acting

Acting, for the benefit

Of those in attendance

Buddy Holly tribute eyewear

In fashion–without thought

Given to rockabilly legends

Some left to make room

for those, yet to come

Modern-day prophets

Rested, never knowing

Their promised lands

Mere words unimportant

Sticks and stones

 

Moving Ahead

Getting ready for a trip out of town. It’s supposed to rain as much as ten inches in the next three days because of a tropical weather system.

That’s making for additional preparations. Should I take umbrellas, rain ponchos? A towel to dry off our two mutts that always travel with us? All of these will be likely be taken.

A new pet barrier was installed between the two front seats in the car. Our dogs are too big to be lap dogs while driving. Maggie will probably still poke her nose behind it–as she tends to get bored easily.

Hoping the rain slacks off as we head northward. Some cooler weather, would also be nice.

The Snake Road

Nobody called it “Snake Road” back then–when we passed en route to family reunions.  Where?  Ware. Where? Ware.  There was no escaping kid silliness at the turn off from tiny Ware, Illinois.

LaRue Road and Forest Service Road 345–better known as the “Snake Road” in the Shawnee National Forest of Southern Illinois is closed for reptilian and amphibian spring migrations from limestone bluffs to nearby swamps–as it has been for four decades.

The road is closed again, when migration reverses from summer to winter habitats. It’s a herpetologist’s dream come true.  For those squeamish about slithering creatures, a place to avoid.  For those that don’t mind creepy things crawling around their feet–pedestrian traffic is welcomed.

Would you dare brave the two-and-a-half mile “Snake Road” on foot?  It may be small comfort to know that snakes keep the rodent population in check.

The list of amphibians and reptiles given right-of-way is quite diverse–from bird-voiced tree frogs, eastern hognosed snakes, worm snakes, five-lined skinks, to timber rattlesnakes, and much more.

Nature’s wonders allowed to progress, with the minor inconvenience, of a twice-yearly blocked country road.  Have a “slithery” day!

 

http://www.mailroom_r9_shawnee@fs.fed.us/–