Wasn’t Ready For “IT”

Humidity was stifling. “IT” had rained nearly every day or night.  Was this the way aging crept up on us?  The same conditions year-after-year, our ability to cope decreased proportionately.

Why was the word ‘IT’ given so much importance?  Weren’t there other, two-letter words of equal value?  “Well, ‘IT’ happened.” “That was the way ‘IT’ came and went.” Sometimes I wished “IT” would go away.

My front porch, purple New Guinea impatiens, succumbed from lack of water during my absence.  Three plastic jugs of water left–no more than two feet away.

Watering instructions left with a neighbor, were all for naught.  Don’t know why “IT” happened.  My rebellious nature suggested bright orange and yellow, dollar store replacements.  The irony of “IT” would likely be wasted.  “IT” was, what “IT” was.  Just stop “IT!”

Horses, Hams, Hacksaws & Whatever Else I Can Come Up With

“Put some elbow grease into it,” really meant putting more effort into a task. It’s a strange expression, if taken literally. What was elbow grease? Where did the expression originate? Did well-lubricated elbows function more efficiently?

“Your eyes were bigger than your stomach.” An expression that went along with, “waste not, want not.” Don’t take something if you don’t really want it. How could someone’s eyes be bigger, than one’s stomach? What a freak show that would be.

“If it thundered in December, it would snow in May.” An old bromide from my Midwestern roots. It did occasionally snow in April, rarely in May. The point was, December thunder and lightning storms, were weird. It was supposed to snow in December.

“Blue racer snakes would chase you.” I never had it happen to me–that was the legend. Also, if the snake was cut into pieces, left for dead; it would come back together overnight, and slither away.

Chickens weren’t exactly the brainiacs of the barnyard. It was alleged, that if one got a chicken to stand still, and a line was drawn in the dirt, the chicken would stand still, mesmerized.

Good luck charms: Rabbit’s feet, horseshoes, four-leaf clovers–how did these come to be regarded as good luck charms? Some people had “lucky shirts.” …Lucky colors, …Lucky days. I guess just about anything could be a good luck charm–if we wanted it to be. One thing’s for sure, the rabbit charm, wasn’t lucky for the rabbit.

Better Things To Talk About?

A miscue, gaffe

Regurgitated

Everywhere

From highest potentate

To lowest Joe Schmoe

Till everyone’s

Cup runneth over

With latest hackneyed

Cliche word of the day

What it meant?

What was implied?

Was it foreign?

Secret code?

Something? Nothing?

Amusing?  Serious?

More questions than

An average two-year old

Could ask in a day

I’m not inclined

To join in the fray

A word that you’ll

Not, hear here

So What’s the Deal?

Have you ever wondered why wayward wanderers were wayward?

What’s to gain from protesting intolerance by being intolerant?

Why does my nose itch when carving a roasted chicken or turkey?

Will there ever be a Fat & Furious franchise–if so, I’m in?

Today was National Middle Child Day, but nobody knew about it.

Why do Windows updates always take out my favorite things?

Are the roads not taken still available?

Why not drink the last drop first-wouldn’t that make it last longer?

Are introverts innies or outies?

The Qualm Before the Storm

Throughout the ages, things were named

Things did what things were intended to do

Sometimes same things had different names

Some people had couches in their living rooms

Others insisted they were davenports

Diehards argued for davinettes

They’d be davinettes, till the day they died

No matter–they were still the same things

Served the same purposes

Some didn’t like current names for things

They preferred different, new “thing” names

New names–for the same old things

Other than being confusing for those familiar

With the old names, things still did the same things

In spite of changes in their nomenclature